Training Insights… Rescue Diver Part 7: What is a Rescue Diver?

By the end of the PADI Rescue Diver course your students will have mastered all the skills and knowledge in the course, but they will not be perfect. Divers should understand that following the guidelines and being willing to try are more important than being technically perfect.

Rescue Divers are divers that have mastered personal skills, buddy skills and have been introduced to rescue management skills. These divers are ideal to move onto a Master Scuba Diver, Divemaster or TecRec course. Don’t try to force them, but do chat to them, emphasise the value of the skills they have and ask them where they would like to go next.

This article concludes our Training Insights… Rescue Diver series. Here’s a recap on the previous blogs in this series. Save these links and use them as a refresher for new and experienced PADI Pros within your business:

RDOnLn0310_1204Part 1: Who are our potential PADI Rescue Divers?

Part 2: How do you get divers interested in the course?

Part 3: What does the Rescue Diver course consist of?

Part 4: Skills Review and Development

Part 5: Applying Knowledge and Skills

Part 6: Rescue Techniques

If you haven’t done so already, make sure you download your free marketing toolkit to help promote the PADI Rescue Diver course to potential students. For any enquiries about the toolkit please contact [email protected]

For more information on the training requirements for PADI courses, please contact [email protected].

Training Insights… PADI Rescue Diver Part 5: Applying Knowledge and Skills

In the previous two articles within this series, we’ve reviewed both Knowledge Development and Skills Review & Development aspects of the PADI Rescue Diver course.

This article will look at how we can help PADI Rescue Diver students apply the knowledge and skills they’ve already learnt through the creation of a real emergency plan and two rescue scenarios.

#1 – Two rescue scenarios in open water

These are carried out as a team and should be realistic. That means that the situation and the “surprises” they encounter along the way should be things that could actually happen in a real life emergency situation. This helps to test their ability to Stop, Think and then Act whilst solving problems effectively with the resources available. However, don’t forget the scenario must also be appropriate to the level and skills they’ve covered in the course i.e. no overhead environments etc.

This is where your certified assistants and trainees can really help – by playing the parts of divers, victims, snorkelers, on-lookers etc. Prepare the scenario in advance so that everyone knows what they are doing. The more lifelike the set-up, and the more everyone performs their role, the greater the benefit to students.

#2 – Emergency Assistance Plan

It can be helpful to complete this early in the course, based upon the location where the students will do the rescue scenarios. This means that when they conduct the scenarios they will see the benefits of their preparation and will be encouraged to practice this in the future in their own diving, by making similar enquiries (or even a full Emergency Assistance Plan) for other sites before they dive there.

If you haven’t done so already, make sure you download your free marketing toolkit to help promote the PADI Rescue Diver course to potential students. For any enquiries about the toolkit please contact [email protected]

For more information on the training requirements for PADI courses, please contact [email protected].

Training Insights… PADI Rescue Diver Part 4: Rescue Diver Skills Review & Development

Following from last week’s article on what the PADI Rescue Diver course consists of, we’ll look now at skills review and development. There are two sections where divers refresh and develop their personal skills:

#1 Self-Rescue Review

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Remind divers that they already have some rescue skills from their previous training. Do make sure they are comfortable helping themselves before they start to focus on assisting other divers. This can be done in confined or open water, and students should be confident with their self-rescue skills before moving on.

#2 10 Rescue Exercises

Each student must master the Performance Requirements in open water, although you can have them practice in confined water first. Make sure you demonstrate new skills and then have each diver take turns practising. You may use your certified assistants as “victims” to help scheduling, but divers can also learn by being “rescued” as well as by “rescuing” – this can add some extra fun into the course, especially for friends taking their course together, as well as giving divers the chance to self-critique through watching fellow students’ techniques.

If you haven’t done so already, make sure you download your free marketing toolkit to help promote the PADI Rescue Diver course to additional divers. For any enquiries about the toolkit please contact [email protected]

For more information on the training requirements for PADI courses, please contact [email protected].

Training Insights… PADI Rescue Diver Part 3: What does the Rescue Diver course consist of?

Before you teach your first PADI Rescue Diver course (or as a review before further courses) check out the relevant section on the course within your Guide to Teaching. This reviews the fundamental course philosophies, ideas on how to schedule the various components of training, and methods of conducting the skills and scenarios.

We’ll look at one section at a time, starting with the theory.

Knowledge Development

Tip #1 Provide time for student discussion

shutterstock_184205429Allow plenty of time for open discussion when you review Knowledge Reviews. Rescue Diver is one course where there is often more than one way to achieve goals, and encouraging divers to think about the pros and cons of their answers is a great learning tool, both for them and for fellow students.

Tip #2 Give them time to apply their learning before the exam

The PADI Rescue Diver exam can be quite a toughy for the students – so give them plenty of time to absorb and apply the information before they complete it.

rescueoutlineTip #3 Use the resources available to prepare

Make sure you also check out the Rescue Diver course presentation notes on the PADI Pros’ Site, which can be found under Training Essentials > Curriculum > Diver Training under the ‘Rescue Diver’ heading. These will help you prepare for and structure your knowledge development sessions effectively.

If you haven’t done so already, make sure you download your free marketing toolkit to help promote the PADI Rescue Diver course to additional divers. For any enquiries about the toolkit please contact [email protected]

For more information on the training requirements for PADI courses, please contact [email protected].

Training Insights… PADI Rescue Diver Part 2: How do you get divers interested in the course?

PADI Rescue Diver training improves the diver’s personal skill level and confidence as well as gaining the in-water and management skills to help others. If divers aren’t quite confident enough to sign up for their Rescue Diver course, offer them an integrated package (which we talked about in our last article) so that they can do other courses in order to refresh their skills and prepare them for the rescue exercises.

PADI456Tip #1 Encourage them to be the best buddy!

Stress the importance of being able to help your buddies or dive team. Nobody likes to be in a situation where they can’t help, and PADI Rescue Divers follow simple guidelines to be able to provide assistance when something goes wrong. None of us can perform miracles, but knowing you have done everything possible is the next best thing.

Tip #2 Remind them that every diver has some rescue skills already.

Even if divers don’t believe they can do it, remind them that they have already mastered self and buddy rescue skills during their PADI Open Water Diver course that they are able to build upon – for example:

  • Mask Clear
  • Regulator Recovery
  • Cramp Release
  • Tired Diver Tows
  • Alternate Air Source Use
  • CESA
  • .etc.

Tip #3 Work around their schedule

PADI352In some areas divers are reluctant to do a Rescue Diver course because they don’t want to miss out on the scenic diving that’s offer, especially if they’re spending holiday time to enjoy the underwater world. Others may simply not have enough time to commit to any entire weekend in one go.

If you have enough daylight hours, why not offer an (early) evening course, split over 4 or five evenings. Alternatively, divers may be tempted to do one dive in the morning and some training in the afternoon. Offering flexibility in times will open the door to more customers taking courses with your business.

Download your free marketing toolkit to help promote the PADI Rescue Diver course. For any enquiries about this toolkit please contact [email protected]

For more information on the training requirements for PADI courses, please contact [email protected].

Training Insights… PADI Rescue Diver Part 1: Who are our potential PADI Rescue Divers?

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Any PADI Open Water Diver aged 12 years or older can start their PADI Rescue Diver course by completing the Knowledge Development and Rescue Exercises in confined water! Encourage them to consider PADI Rescue Diver training as an integrated part of their development.

PADI Adventure Divers who have completed the Underwater Navigation dive can complete the full PADI Rescue Diver course.

Top Tip: Targeted Packages to Drive Sales

To help boost your sales in continuing education courses, why not create an email campaign that targets your existing PADI Open Water Diver customers. Offer them a package to include PADI Adventure Diver/Advanced Open Water Diver and PADI Rescue Diver.

Better still, if your divers are local or are staying in your area for a few weeks, offer them a PADI Master Scuba Diver package that includes:

  • PADI Advanced Open Water Diver
  • PADI Rescue Diver
  • 5 x PADI Specialty courses
  • Getting 50 logged dives as experience

This the ideal way to combine training and diving into the ultimate experience that delivers a win-win for both your business and your customers.

Promoting the course package:

By using EVE, you can use your customer database to deliver relevant, targeted email campaigns automatically and with ease. For more tips, check out this video or contact your PADI Regional Manager.

Alternatively, invite existing PADI Open Water divers to attend an informal evening where you can organise fun talks, workshops and information about courses to inspire them to sign up (as well as gain additional equipment sales on the night).

To help promote the courses, you can download a free digital marketing toolbox which includes posters, leaflets, flyers and email graphics. You can use these materials to advertise the PADI Advanced Open Water Diver course, the PADI Rescue Diver course and the PADI Master Scuba Diver course plus many more. Click here to download the toolbox in ZIP format. You can also access it from within the PADI Pros’ Site by visiting Toolbox > Marketing > Marketing Campaign > and in the section ‘Campaign Tools PADI Europe, Middle East and Africa’.

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For more information about the free digital marketing toolbox please contact [email protected].

For more information on the training requirements for PADI courses, please contact [email protected].